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Conditions migraine sufferers are sometimes misdiagnosed with

Migraine sufferers in Illinois know all too well how headaches of this nature can affect their daily life. Because of the way nerve pathways and chemicals in the brain are affected by this condition, however, symptoms associated with migraines can mimic symptoms of other conditions. This unique characteristic of migraines sometimes leads to misdiagnoses. According to one study, only one in 20 patients are correctly diagnosed with migraines.

Making a claim for a botox injury in Illinois

There are many reasons why a person might decide to have Botox procedures or other injectables. Botox can be used for cosmetic reasons, but it has also been shown to reduce the pain associated with migraines. Other injectables may be used in lips or cheeks in order to achieve the desired aesthetic affect.

Use of EHRs may lead to medical errors

Electronic health records are increasingly used in medical practice in Illinois, but they may play a part in medical safety errors, especially errors in medication. A study published by Health Affairs found that more than 50 percent of pediatric medical errors were linked to the functionality of EHR systems. The studied involved more than 9000 safety reports from people who were patients from 2012 to 2017. Records from three separate healthcare companies were examined.

An improper diagnosis can be fatal

Patients depend on their doctors for many things, ranging from the basic, such as well-checks or influenza treatment, through broken bones and minor surgeries, and all the way to life-threatening conditions. At every stage there is a level of competence required by the doctor or the patient may suffer harm. In many cases, errors are made not as often in actively doing something wrong as a surgical error, for instance, but in a misdiagnosis of observed symptoms.

Study analyzes how physician behaviors factor into misdiagnoses

Every year in the U.S., an estimated 12 million adult outpatients are the victims of diagnostic errors. A study published by Health Affairs has explored the patient-physician interactions that might contribute to these errors. It should be of interest to Illinois residents who have been the victims of medical malpractice.

Surgeon mistakes kidney for tumor during back surgery

Illinois readers likely can't imagine being put under anesthesia for back surgery and waking up to find out that one of their kidneys had been mistakenly removed. However, that's exactly what happened to a Floria woman, according to a recently filed administrative complaint.

Reducing drug errors with pharmacist and patient intervention

Pharmacists are often the last line of defense when it comes to preventing possible medication mistakes that may adversely affect patients in Illinois. Yet dispensing errors could be responsible for just under 22 percent of medication oversights that may impact patients' health, according to results from one study. This doesn't mean pharmacists don't actively try to protect patients as much as possible. However, patients can be equally proactive when it comes to reducing pharmacy-related mistakes.

Proving negligence as an injured patient

When you suffer injuries as a result of a hospital visit, or if your condition worsens because of a delayed or wrong diagnosis, it is likely that you will feel that you have been failed by your medical practitioners. As a patient in a hospital, you depend on your physicians to an extremely high degree, and it follows that they have a legal duty to provide you with the best possible care.

Study suggests link between doctor burnout and medical errors

Doctors in Illinois and other parts of the United States typically make every effort to successfully treat patients. Even so, a survey involving nearly 7,000 hospital and clinical physicians suggests that many doctors in the U.S. are burnt out and more likely to make patient-related errors. The poll covered a wide range of issues that may affect doctor performance, including workplace safety and personal issues such as depression, fatigue and suicidal thoughts.

How women are often misdiagnosed

Some women in Illinois might struggle to get a medical diagnosis compared to men. Women have a 50 percent higher chance of not being diagnosed with heart disease, and this is true even after a heart attack. They are more likely to die in the hospital after a heart attack and are 30 percent more likely to have a stroke misdiagnosed. Pain is more likely to be ignored, and autoimmune diseases, which are far more common in women, may take years to diagnose.